Data Center 2.0 – The Sustainable Data Center, Now Available!

Data Center 2.0 – The Sustainable Data Center is now available. Data Center 2.0

The book is showing up on the websites of Amazon and will soon starts to pop up on websites of other  E-tailers’ .

Data Center 2.0 – The Sustainable Data Center is an in-depth look into the steps needed to transform modern-day data centers into sustainable entities.

See the press release:

Some nice endorsements were received:

“Data Center 2.0, is not so much about technology but about people, society and economic development. By helping readers understand that even if Data Centers, enabling the Digital economy, are contributing a lot to energy saving, they need to be sustainable themselves; Rien Dijkstra is on the right track. When explaining how to build sustainable Data Centers, through multi disciplinary approach, breaking the usual silos of the different expertise, Rien Dijkstra is proposing the change of behavior needed to build sustainable Data Centers. Definitely it is about people, not technology.” 

Paul-Francois Cattier, Global Senior Vice-President Data Center – Schneider Electric

“In Data Center 2.0 The Sustainable Data Center author Rien Dijkstra has gone several steps further in viewing the data center from the perspective of long term ownership and efficiency in combination with treating it as a system. It’s an excellent read with many sections that could be extracted and utilized in their own right. I highly recommend this read for IT leaders who are struggling with the questions of whether to add capacity (co-locate, buy, build, or lease) or how to create a stronger organizational ownership model for existing data center capacity. The questions get more complex every year and the risks more serious for the business. The fact that you’re making a business critical decision that must stand the test of technology and business change over 15 years is something you shouldn’t take lightly.” 

Mark Thiele, President and Founder Data Center Pulse

“Data centers used to be buildings to house computer servers along with network and storage systems, a physical manifestation of the Digital Economy. Internet of Things, the digitization of about everything in and around us, brings many profound changes. A data center is the place where it all comes together. Physical and digital life, fueled by energy and IT, economical and social demands and needs and not to forget sustainability considerations. Sustainable data centers have a great potential to help society to optimize the use of resources and to eliminate or reduce wastes of capital, human labor and energy. A data center in that sense is much more than just a building for servers. It has become a new business model. Data center 2.0 is a remarkable book that describes the steps and phases to facilitate and achieve this paradigm.” 

John Post, Managing Director – Foundation Green IT Amsterdam region

Preview Data Center 2.0 – The Sustainable Data Center

Data Center 2.0: The Sustainable Data Center is an in-depth look into the steps needed toData Center 2.0 transform modern-day data centers into sustainable entities.

To get an impression of the book you can read the prologue right here.

Prologue

In large parts of the world, computers, Internet services, mobile communication, and cloud computing have become a part of our daily lives, professional and private. Information and communication technology has invaded our life and is recognized as a crucial enabler of economic and social activities across all sectors of our society. The opportunity of anytime, anywhere being connected to communicate and interact and to exchange data is changing the world.

During the last two decades, a digital information infrastructure has been created whose functioning is critical to our society, governmental, and business processes and services, which depend on computers. Data centers, buildings to house computer servers along with network and storage systems, are a crucial part of this critical digital infrastructure. They are the physical manifestation of the digital economy and the virtual and digital information infrastructure, were data is processed, stored, and transmitted.

A data center is a very peculiar and special place. It is the place were different worlds meet each other. It is a place where organizational (and individual) information needs and demands are translated in bits and bytes that are subsequently translated in electrons that are moved around the world. It is the place where the business, IT, and energy worlds come together. Jointly they form a jigsaw puzzle of stakeholders with different and sometimes conflicting interests and objectives that are hard to manage and to control.

Electricity is the foundation of all digital information processing and digital services that are mostly provided from data centers. The quality and availability of the data center stands or falls with the quality and availability of the power supply to the data center.

For data centers, the observation is made that the annualized costs of power-related infrastructure has, in some cases, grown to equal the annualized capital costs of the IT equipment itself. Data centers have reached the point that the electricity costs of a server over its lifetime will equal or pass the price of the hardware. Also, it is estimated that data centers are responsible for about 2% of the total world electricity consumption.

It is therefore easy to understand why the topic of electricity usage of data centers is a subject of discussion.

Electricity is still mostly generated with fossil fuel-based primary energy resources such as coal, gas, and oil. But this carbon-constrained power sector is under pressure. Resilience to a changing climate makes the decarburization of these energy sources mandatory to ensure sustainability.

From different parts of society the sustainability of data centers is questioned. Energy efficiency and indirect CO2 emissions caused by the consumption of carbon-based electricity are criticized.

The data center industry is working hard on these issues. According to the common view, it comes down to implementing technical measures. The idea is that more efficient power usage of servers, storage and network components, improved utilization, and better power and cooling management in data centers will solve the problems.

This idea can be questioned. Data centers are part of complex supply chains and have many stakeholders with differing perspectives, incomplete, contradictory, and changing requirements and complex interdependencies. In this situation there is no simple, clear definition of data center efficiency, and there is no simple right or optimal solution.

According to the Brundtland Commision of the United Nations, sustainability is “to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

Given the fact that we are living in a world with limited resources and the demand for digital infrastructure is growing exponentially, there will be limits that will be encountered. The limiting factor to future economic development is the availability and the functioning of natural capital. Therefore, we need a new and better industrial model.

Creating sustainable data centers is not a technical problem but an economic problem to be solved.

A sustainable data center should be environmentally viable, economically equitable, and socially bearable.

This book takes a conceptual approach to the subject of data centers and sustainability. The proposition of the book is that we must fundamentally rethink the “data center equation” of “people, planet, profit” in order to become sustainable.

The scope of this search goes beyond the walls of the data center itself. Given the great potential of information technology to transform today’s society into one characterized by sustainability what is the position of data centers?

The data center is the place where it all comes together: energy, IT, and societal demands and needs.

Sustainable data centers have a great potential to help society to optimize the use of resources and to eliminate or reduce wastes of capital, human labor and energy.

The idea is that a sustainable data center is based on economics, organization, people and technology. This book offers at least multiple views and aspects on sustainable data centers to allow readers to gain a better understanding and provoke thoughts on how to create sustainable data centers.

Creating a sustainable data center calls for a multidisciplinary approach and for different views and perspectives in order to obtain a good understanding of what is at stake.

The solution is, at the end of the day, a question of commitment.

Data Center 2.0 – The Sustainable Data Center (Update)

Data Center 2.0: The Sustainable Data Center is an in-depth look into the steps needed to transform modern-day data centers into sustainable entities. The book will be published at the beginning of the summer.

To get an impression see the following slide deck.

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Data Center 2.0 – The Sustainable Data Center

DC20_SustainableDataCenter
Currently busy with the final steps to get the forthcoming book ‘Data Center 2.0 – The Sustainable Data Center’ (ISBN 978-1499224689) published at the beginning of the summer.

Some quotes from the book:

“A data center is a very peculiar and special place. It is the place where different worlds meet each other. A place where organizational (and individual) information needs and demands are translated in bits and bytes that are subsequently translated in electrons that are moved around the world. It is the place where the business, IT and energy world come together. Jointly they form a jigsaw puzzle of stakeholders with different and sometimes conflicting interests and objectives that are hard to manage and to control.Data Center 2.0

Given the great potential of Information Technology to transform today’s society into one characterised by sustainability what is the position of data centers?

……..

The data center is the place were it all comes together: energy, IT and societal demands and needs.

…….

A sustainable data center should be environmentally viable, economically equitable, and socially bearable. To become sustainable, the data center industry must free itself from the shackles of 19th century based ideas and concepts of production. They are too simple for our 21th century world.

The combination of service-dominant logic and cradle-to-cradle makes it possible to create a sustainability data center industry.

Creating sustainable data centers is not a technical problem but an economic problem to be solved.”

The book takes a conceptual approach on the subject of data centers and sustainability. It offers at least multiple views and aspects on sustainable data centers to allow readers to gain a better understanding and provoke thoughts on how to create sustainable data centers.

The book has already received endorsements of Paul-Francois Cattier Global Senior, Vice President Data Center of Schneider Electric and John Post, Managing Director of Foundation  Green IT Amsterdam region.

Table of contents

1 Prologue
2 Signs Of The Time
3 Data Centers, 21th Century Factories
4 Data Centers A Critical Infrastructure
5 Data Centers And The IT Supply Chain
6 The Core Processes Of A Data Center
7 Externalities
8 A Look At Data Center Management
9 Data Center Analysis
10 Data Center Monitoring and Control
11 The Willingness To Change
12 On The Move: Data Center 1.5
13 IT Is Transforming Now!
14 Dominant Logic Under Pressure
15 Away From The Dominant Logic
16 A New Industrial Model
17 Data Center 2.0

Data center CO2 emissions

There have been some debate about the source of electricity a data center is using and the CO2 emissions it is causing.

Recently some interesting figures came available by the International Energy Agency. These are the CO2 emissions per kWh electricity generation. Published in the 2013 edition of “CO2 emissions from fuel combustion – Highlights”.

It isn’t easy to find consistent and complete time series. A lot of the data that can be found is using different definitions and/or different time periods what makes it difficult to aggregate these figures. IEA has published time series for the period 1990 – 2011.

To make some comparisons a selection from different parts of the world is showed in table 1. Remarkable differences in CO2 emissions can be found. Some countries show a huge decrease of CO2/kwH emission during the period 1990 – 2011 whereas others show an increase. Also within a region the differences are considerable. Zooming in on the E.U. countries with Tier 1 data center markets; United Kingdom, France, Germany and The Netherlands, (with the DC hubs London, Paris, Frankfurt and Amsterdam) we see a CO2/kwH reduction of 34.4%, 41.9%, 21.4% and 33.4%. Differences in emissions and emissions trends are caused by different energy policies and different compositions of the power plant fleet.

Table 1. CO2 emission per kWh from electricity generation, source IEA.

  2011kg CO2 /kwH Difference 1990 -2011

%

E.U. 0.352 -21.4
United Kingdom 0.441 -34.4
France 0.061 -41.9
Germany 0.477 -21.4
The Netherlands 0.404 -33.4
Russian Federation 0.437 7.6
U.S.A. 0.503 -13.6
Canada 0.167 -14.8
Australia 0.823 0.7
Singapore 0.500 -44.9
Japan 0.497 14.3
Korea 0.545 4.8
India 0.856 5.4
China 0.764 -14.5

 

The figures that are showed are averages. The CO2 emission of a data center depends on the power plants that are really used to deliver electricity to the data center. Depending on the electricity demand the power supplier will assign different power plants. The assignment of power plants is according to their production efficiencies (short-run marginal costs of production) and capacity and this production mix will influence the CO2 emission per kwH.

CO2 emission per server

To get an impression of the CO2 emission per server in different parts of the world we making use of the report ”Estimating total power consumption by servers in the U.S. and the world” of J.G. Koomey of Stanford University, the power usage of low, mid and high range server are estimated on 180, 420, and 4800 Watt. This will lead to the figures in table 2 based on a 24 hours x 365 days usage.

Table 2. Yearly CO2 emission per server.

Kg CO2/year Low range server Medium range server High range server
E.U. 555 1295 14801
United Kingdom 695 1623 18543
France 96 224 2565
Germany 752 1755 20057
The Netherlands 637 1486 16987
Russian Federation 689 1608 18375
U.S.A. 793 1851 21150
Canada 263 614 7022
Australia 1298 3028 34606
Singapore 788 1840 21024
Japan 784 1829 20898
Korea 859 2005 22916
India 1350 3149 35993
China 1205 2811 32125

 

Data center use case

What do all these figures mean for a data center? Lets take for example a data center of 1000 servers with a PUE of 1.8. In this case we use a server mix of 95% low range, 4% mid range and 1% high range servers. Besides servers the data center will also use storage and network components. The ratio of the energy use of servers versus the energy use of storage and network components is set to 75:15:10.

We can define a worst-case scenario when electricity is created with conventional coal combustion; in that case 1kW of electricity is equivalent to 1 kg CO2 emission. For the data center in this use case, that would be an upper limit of 4957 ton CO2 per year. In reality power suppliers are using a mix of different energy sources. As we can see in table 3, the lowest emission is 302 ton and the highest emission is 4244 ton. A difference with a factor 14!

Table 3. CO2 emission of a data center.

Metric ton CO2/year Servers Storage Network Data center
E.U. 727 145 97 1745
United Kingdom 911 182 121 2186
France 126 25 17 302
Germany 985 197 131 2365
The Netherlands 835 167 111 2003
Russian Federation 903 181 120 2166
U.S.A. 1039 208 139 2494
Canada 345 69 46 828
Australia 1700 340 227 4080
Singapore 1033 207 138 2479
Japan 1027 205 137 2464
Korea 1126 225 150 2702
India 1768 354 236 4244
China 1578 316 210 3787

 

Zero emission

There is of course the alternative case of zero CO2 emissions if the electricity supply is completely based on nuclear, hydro or renewable energy. Some countries like Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland have extreme low CO2/kwH emission (1, 13, 17 and 30 gram).

 

Online library Green ICT practices available

PowerDCGrid

In the context of a collaboration project between the VU University Amsterdam (Software and Services Research Group) and SURFNet, the VU University Amsterdam developed an on-line library for Green ICT practices. It currently contains 258 practices elicited from both industrial practice and academic publications.

As stated by the project team “In spite of the investments in green ICT, companies and educators lack reusable green practices including operational actions to re-green ICT, metrics, and examples of achieved results. The objective of the project is to make available reusable practices for energy-efficient ICT systems and more sustainable ICT supported processes. By setting up an open green ICT practices library, students, educators and researchers can study and experiment with green practices, and measure the achieved environmental effects and economic benefits.”

Currently the library is presented with a collection of green ICT practices elicited from literature, research/education and industry. It makes explicit their environmental effects and economic benefits, which assists companies and organizations to select the most appropriate green practices for their own green objectives.

The current library can be browsed by category, goal, environmental effect and economic impact.

At this stage they need help to test the library and send them your feedback on usability and any other aspects you deserve as important. Companies that have successful practices and experiences in improving ICT energy efficiency are highly welcome to contribute.

To visit the online library: http://greenpractice.few.vu.nl/.

And for the project description take a look at this site.

Connect the data center directly to the power grid

Are there with a diminishing PUE still opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of data centers? The answer is yes if you take a different look at energy efficiency.

At the DatacenterDynamics Amsterdam 2012 conference there was a (thought) provoking presentation of Siemens. According to the presenter of Siemens you must take the whole energy supply chain into account. That is starting with the power plant and then following the transmission and distribution grid until you finally reach the IT infrastructure in the data center. The energy efficiency of this energy supply chain is expressed in the Primary Energy Factor (PEF). The PEF is the ratio between the energy delivered at the end of the energy supply chain, the building, and the energy input at the beginning of the energy supply chain. An example. The average PEF in The Netherlands is 2.56. With a primary energy factor of 2.56 it takes 2.56 kWh of primary energy to deliver 1 kWh electrical energy.  So there is a considerable loss of energy in the energy supply chain.

Part of these losses are caused by the energy conversion in the power plant. The other losses, T&D losses, are caused by the Transmission and Distribution grid. In 2009 the average T&D losses for the European Union were 5.9%. The T&D losses for countries with Tier 1 data center markets were for the UK 7.1%, The Netherlands 3.8%, Germany 4.2% and for France 6.1%.

T&D Losses source World Bank and DataMarket

See also this link for T&D losses for other countries

The high-voltage grid in The Netherlands has an exceptional quality and reliability, much better then the medium and low voltage grids. So according to the presenter you could reduce energy losses by connecting the data center ‘directly’ to the high voltage grid and at the same time improve the reliability of the electrical energy supply. By connecting the data center ‘directly’ to the high voltage grid you reduce the number of components that are part of the internal electrical infrastructure of the data center. And by doing so, you improve the reliability of your electrical infrastructure. By making the proper connections you could even dispose the diesel generators that are used for back up.

It was shown that because of the exceptional high reliability of the high-voltage grid you could easily create an electrical infrastructure for a data center with a higher availability then a Tier IV data center as defined by the Uptime Institute.

Interesting and provoking thoughts given the fact what another speaker John Post, managing director of Green IT Amsterdam consortium, was telling. Amsterdam is with London, Frankfurt and Paris one of the four Tier 1 data center markets in Europe. According to him the agglomeration of Amsterdam has currently 36 commercial data centers with a CO2 emission of 720 kiloton CO2/year. That is around 15% of the total CO2 emission in the city. The expectation is that in 2015 it will be 930 kiloton/year or 20% of the total CO2 emission. Amsterdam want to reduce their carbon emission in 2025 with 40% compared with the year 1990. This will definitely have an impact on the data centers. Therefore according to John Post data center providers must seek collaboration with energy providers and think about new business models to solve this issue and at the same time being profitable.

See also the blog entries Following the data center energy track and Power markets, Power prices and Data Centres in Europe